Nursing documentation: Mind the gap?

Liz Charalambous is a qualified nurse on a female, acute medical HCOP (Health Care for Older People) ward at Queen’s Medical Centre, Nottingham University Hospital Trust. She is currently a PhD student at The University of Nottingham. She tweets at @lizcharalambou and is a regular guest blogger for the BGS. Her blogs are her own opinion and do not represent the opinion of her employer or any other organisation. Co-author and supervisor, Dr. Sarah Goldberg, is an associate professor at The University of Nottingham. She tweets as @se_goldberg

Introduction

docsNew research out this week highlights the importance of nursing documentation for older patients in an acute hospital setting. The research ‘Gaps, Mishaps and Overlaps: Nursing Documentation, how Does it Affect Care?’ published in The Journal of Research in Nursing found that paperwork is time consuming to complete, takes nurses away from caring for patients, and can be counterproductive to delivering good quality nursing care to older people in hospital.

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Patients don’t just have dementia

Beverley Marriott is Birmingham Community Healthcare Foundation Trust Nurse Practitioner – Community Matron based at Heart of England Good Hope Hospital. She is currently undertaking a Fellowship in Older People at Kings College London. Here she reminds us that we need to see the whole person when looking at someone with dementia.

medical-pillsMany of us work within dementia care on a daily basis. As a community matron on an AMU department supporting safe and timely discharges for patients with dementia, I understand the importance of getting it right and what happens when we get it wrong.

Dementia has reached a critical point – over recent years the government has seen improvements in diagnosis, raising public awareness and promoting dementia friendly settings. However to deliver this level of improvement requires, time, resources and focus.  Continue reading

New institutionalisation following an acute hospital admission

Jenni Harrison is a Clinical Research Fellow in Geriatric Medicine funded by the Alzheimer Scotland Dementia Research Centre and the Centre for Cognitive Ageing and Cognitive Epidemiology at the University of Edinburgh. Here she discusses her recently published paper in Age and Ageing. She tweets @JenniKHarrison.

hospitalNew care home admission (also termed new institutionalisation) following an acute hospital admission occurs commonly in the UK. However, national policy documents argue the practice should generally be avoided. Furthermore it is known to be an area of six-fold variation in practice

However, research to understand new care home admission has been limited and little is known about those who experience this extremely important transition. Our interdisciplinary research study evaluated one hundred people admitted from home to a single hospital who were newly admitted to institutional care at the time of discharge. Continue reading

Do studies of the weekend effect really allow for differences in illness severity?

For nearly 15 years from 1997 until 2011, David Barer and his stroke team colleagues kept a prospective register of all patients admitted to hospital in Gateshead with suspected acute stroke. This was used mainly for research but also allowed independent checks to be made on the official figures from the coding department, providing useful insights into diagnostic uncertainties, the reasons for coding errors and day-to-day and year-on-year changes in the numbers and clinical characteristics of stroke admissions.  In this study he analyses whether the apparent excess mortality among patients admitted at weekends might be due to differences in stroke severity or other factors which cannot be measured in studies relying on routine administrative data.

strokeThe long-rumoured but now notorious “weekend effect” recently received the seal of scientific respectability from two huge studies, analysing routine data on 20 million hospital admissions (and 1/2 million deaths) in England and Wales. They found a 10-15% increase in the risk of dying in the first month after weekend, compared with weekday admissions, even after adjusting for differences in overall “sickness levels” by sophisticated modelling of diagnostic and administrative data.  The authors of the larger study even included non-emergency admissions, despite the obvious imbalance between weekdays and weekends, arguing that their risk model could “explain” most of the mortality variation.  Continue reading

Time to move: Get up, Get Dressed, Keep moving

Dr Amit Arora is a Consultant Physician and Geriatrician at University Hospital of North Staffordshire, Stoke on Trent and an Honorary Clinical Lecturer at Keele University.

deconditioning-1Many years ago I was subject to restricted mobility following an emergency appendicectomy. It took me a surprisingly long time to regain my strengths and abilities- I noted that despite the youth and the will, my muscles would not move and it took a while to recover back to normal!

When I co-relate this to the frail older people that I see in hospitals, I can understand why someone who was able to function well before they came to hospital takes longer to regain their pre-admission functionality.  Prolonged hospital stay, bed rest and attendant risks may lead to loss of muscle power, strength and abilities. This is something we surely need to avoid. It should help achieve a shorter length of stay, better outcomes for patients and better ability at discharge. Continue reading

Choosing the right care for people from nursing homes: Hobson’s Choice, Morton’s Fork or Buridan’s Ass?

Glenn Arendts is Associate Professor in Emergency Medicine at the University of Western Australia and Chair of the Geriatric Special Interest Group of the Australasian College for Emergency Medicine. He writes about his Age & Age paper. 

donkeyHobson’s Choice: A choice where there is really only one option
Morton’s fork: A choice between two equally unpleasant alternatives
Buridan’s Ass: A hungry donkey placed equal distance from two identical bales of hay cannot use reason to choose between them, and so dies of hunger

Take a straw poll of hospital emergency department (ED) staff and you will find majority support for the following statement: “too many people from nursing homes are sent to the ED”. That your poll results may say something about the views of some hospital staff toward nursing home (NH) residents is immaterial. Acute medical care of dependent people with life limiting illness is an area of legitimate concern, and the prevailing orthodoxy is that ED is a less than ideal place to deliver it. For decades, health services have invested in a variety of programs and interventions to reduce the transfer from NH to ED. Continue reading

Paramedics; Frailty detection and admission avoidance

Dr Amy Heskett works as a Speciality Doctor within the West Kent Urgent Care Home Treatment Service. This team aims to prevent hospital admissions by working alongside GPs, nurses, carers and paramedics to provide a holistic management plan. She writes a blog about her experiences on her blog communitydoctoramy.wordpress.com and can be found on twitter @mrsapea

paramedics-photoThe West Kent Home Treatment Service provides home-based medical treatments to avoid hospital admissions when appropriate. Referrals come from GPs, Community Nurses and Paramedics; but more importantly our team widens as soon as we start to work with patients, their family and carers.

A day of referrals began with a call from a Paramedic who had attended V after she had fallen in her bedroom, but luckily sustained no injury. This was on a background of dementia and the need for daily support from her son to assist with meals, prompt medications and support trips made outside the home. V’s only other medical history was that of hypertension and one fall a year ago. V was normally able to get herself to the toilet and used a stick to mobilise slowly indoors; while carers attended once a day to provide personal care. Continue reading

Benchmarking Older People’s Care in Acute Settings

Lindsey Ashley is the Communications Manager for the NHS Benchmarking Network and is a strong advocate for benchmarking our NHS services.

acuteIt is recognised in the NHS and the media that older people are a major service user cohort for health and social care services, both in hospital (the acute setting) and in the community. It is well described that the population is ageing, as people are living longer, and as a result, there are more older people as a proportion of the overall population. Whilst overall life expectancy is rising, there are also significant inequalities across the country in terms of life expectancy. Continue reading

Hospital at Home Forum at the BGS Autumn Meeting

Dr Graham Ellis is an Associate Medical Director and Older Peoples Services Consultant Geriatrician for NHS Lanarkshire. He is also one of the key speakers at the Hospital at Home UK Forum at the BGS Autumn Meeting on Wednesday 23rd November in Glasgow. 

home-heartOlder people are presenting to acute hospitals in greater numbers year on year. Predictions of the future demographic raise serious questions about the sustainability of hospital based services. The Future Hospitals Commission recommended the development of specialist hospital services in the community delivering new and innovative services closer to the point of need.

Older people’s services in particular are challenged to meet existing and predicted demand. Recent headlines have highlighted inadequate alternatives to admission for older people. Yet older people should receive high quality, safe and effective care best suited to their needs that includes Comprehensive Geriatric Assessment.  Continue reading

A Bespoke Blue Light Response to Frail Older Fallers: Makes Complete Sense – But Does It Work?

Spencer Winch is a specialist paramedic in urgent care and a trainee advanced clinical practitioner in emergency care. He has a special interest in falls and care of the frail older patient and his time is currently split between the ambulance service, the local emergency department and a masters degree in advanced clinical practice. @spencerlwinch

Anna Puddy, Kate Ellis, Gill Carlill, Josie Caffrey, Claire Wiggett and Moyra Pugh are all advanced hospital based occupational therapists specialising in emergency, acute and elderly care. @TheRealAnnaPud, @OTMoyra, @CaffreyJosie

South Western Ambulance VX09FYPWith falls in patients over the age of 65 making up 8.5% of the emergency workload locally, paramedics and the ambulance service have found themselves in a prime position to assess, treat and discharge this cohort of patients pre-hospitally. This upholds Keogh’s vision that care and treatment should be delivered closer to home without the need for hospital, and is being achieved by ambulance crews on a daily basis as highlighted in a consultant paramedic colleague’s (NWAmb_Duncan – link to BGS blog) recent blog. Higher education and degree based programmes for the paramedic profession now encourage more thorough assessment of injury and illness and thoughts around causative factors of falls, length of lie and potential for acute kidney injury. Those that are discharged on scene are then flagged to the community falls prevention teams for mobility, functionality and care assessment provided by nurse and therapists. With increasing demand on all NHS healthcare agencies, these assessments are not instantaneous and literature would suggest that those who have fallen, are likely to fall again within 24 hours without immediate intervention. Continue reading