Why the BGS Fringe?

Muna Al Jawad is a Consultant Geriatrician at Royal Sussex County Hospital in Brighton. Here she discusses the BGS Fringe which will be taking place at the BGS Autumn Meeting in London on 23 November. She tweets @OPWhisperer

The idea for the BGS Fringe comes from an emotion: Frustration, and a cause: Resistance. Frustration first. I realise this might be heresy (especially on a blog for the BGS) but the national conference really frustrates me. Geriatricians are the funniest, quirkiest and most humble of doctors. Lots of us chose geriatrics because we want to work with geriatricians. Of all the hospital specialists, we pride ourselves on being the most holistic, we see aim to see our patients as human beings, within their network of family and carers. “Aha!” the geriatrician will say on a ward round, “I know Mrs Jones, she loves Elvis and has a watch with a cat on it” (I actually said that last week).
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East Midlands Dementia Day 2016

Liz Charalambous is a qualified nurse on a female, acute medical HCOP (Health Care for Older People) ward at Queen’s Medical Centre, Nottingham University Hospital Trust. She attended the East Midlands Dementia Day on 6 December 2016. She tweets at @lizcharalambou and is a regular guest blogger for the BGS. Opinions expressed in this blog are solely Liz’s own and do not express the views or opinions of her employer or any other organisation. 

major-oak-sherwood-forestThe East Midlands Dementia Day on 6 December 2016 at Nottingham City Hospital proved to be an inspiring and informative event. Organised by dementia specialists, Professor Rowan Harwood and Dr. Karen Harrison-Dening, the day welcomed expert speakers from Nottingham and further afield.

The day began with Professor Rowan Harwood  who presented an overview of dementia and its increasing importance from a public health and societal perspective. Painting the picture of the reality of dementia with stark statistics of multiple comorbidities; dementia in care homes and in hospital; and the reality of carer and family support for people with the disease, stressed the urgent need for further research. Continue reading

Every older person in a care home needs access to high quality healthcare

chg-v2The British Geriatrics Society (BGS) calls for everyone who commissions or provides healthcare in care homes to follow the principles of good practice set out in the guidance we are publishing today, so that every older person who lives in a care home in the UK has access to high quality healthcare which fully meets their needs. Based on the clinical expertise of our members our updated guidance sets out clinical and service priorities for how best practice can be achieved, and provides clear indicators of what successful delivery looks like for older people, their families and carers.

In the UK 405,000 people over the age of 65 years old currently live in care homes. This represents 16% of older people over the age of 85. Their healthcare needs are complex and the average care home resident has multiple long-term conditions, and frailty. They are likely to have better health outcomes if health services reflect these needs, and they have access to comprehensive, multidisciplinary assessment, with input from healthcare specialists trained in the care of complex medical problems in later life. Continue reading

An overview of the Policy Forum for Wales event

Hospital in Bridgend, Wales. He is a care of the elderly physician with an interest in Parkinson’s Disease and movement disorders.
flag_of_wales_2-svgOrganised by the Policy Forum for Wales, this event which was held on 19 October, provided the Welsh Government, and other agencies, the opportunity to engage with key stakeholders and discuss public health policy issues that particularly affect Wales. This seminar was about involving health and social care senior policy makers in developing a vision for Wales and bringing together multiple organisations (public sector, voluntary and third sector) to have a dialogue about how best to influence the Welsh Government’s health and social care policies.

The day was kicked off by chair Mr Huw Irranca – Davies AM, with a cross party group on cancer introducing the theme of the day. This was followed by brief from Professor Siobhan McClelland on current trends in health care in Wales including a £700 million gap in the budget for health and social care (10% of the total health budget). She emphasised that service configurations should be decided according to local need rather than by committee or Government mandate. Continue reading

BGS raising the profile of Sarcopenia and Frailty in older people

1025_atrophySarcopenia, the loss of skeletal muscle mass and function that accompanies ageing, has emerged as a key topic in geriatric medicine and represents a rapidly expanding field of research. Prevalence may be as high as 1 in 3 for frail older people living in care homes. There is increasing appreciation of sarcopenia’s importance for an ageing population and a growing understanding of its causes. The condition is closely linked to physical frailty and detection of sarcopenia is beginning to be incorporated into clinical practice, and to undergo large clinical trials.

To better represent this area the British Geriatrics Society has announced the formation of a new Special Interest Group (SIG) focusing on sarcopenia and frailty research.

In addition, to help raise the profile and aid the recognition of sarcopenia, a dedicated session covering diagnosis and treatment of the disease is being held at the BGS Autumn Meeting in Glasgow. Continue reading

John’s Campaign Conference; Stay with me

Liz Charalambous is a qualified nurse on a female, acute medical HCOP (Health Care for Older People) ward at Queen’s Medical Centre, Nottingham University Hospital Trust. She was one of the speakers at the John’s Campaign Conference. She tweets at @lizcharalambou and is a regular guest blogger for the BGS.

johns-campaignI was proud to be invited to speak this week at the John’s Campaign Conference on 12th October. The conference proved to be an oasis of light, love, and hope in the often gruelling and lonely journey of dementia. Nicci Gerrard and Julia Jones, co-founders of John’s Campaign, who both have personal experience of caring for loved ones with dementia, pulled together a groundbreaking and heartwarming conference, which was nothing short of miraculous. Nicci and Julia began what they described as a ‘kitchen table revolution’ to campaign to change the draconian restricted visiting arrangements of adult hospital care, advocating that people with dementia should have the support of their loved ones while in hospital. Continue reading

Top 10 things we can do to improve care for older people right now

Mitsuko Nakajima (CMT1), Mary Ní Lochlainn (FY1), James Maguire (Registrar), Myuran Kaneshamoorthy (CT2), Jen Pigott (CT2), James Manger (CT2), Elizabeth Lonsdale-Eccles (CT2), Nivedika Theivendran (CT2), Laura Hill (CT2), Maevis Tan (CT2), Thomas Bell (ST3), Mark Lethby (CT2) & Alvin Shrestha (Clinical Fellow).

On February 6th-7th the BGS (British Geriatrics Society) Trainees Weekend took place in London. At one of the workshops, a group of us looked at how we can influence our colleagues to improve care for older people and also how we can conduct QI projects in non-geriatric settings. The workshop aimed to empower doctors who were not yet on a geriatric medicine training scheme to make a difference, especially where patients were unlikely to be seen by a geriatrician.

At the end of the workshop, the group put their heads together to come up with a Top 10 list, of things we can do to improve care for older people right now. Here are the results:

Continue reading

BGS Spring Meeting

4451736917_75a0098a01_oTom Dening is a Professor of Dementia Research at the Institute of Mental Health, University of Nottingham. 

Spring in Nottingham! What could be finer? Little spring flowers bursting out all over University Park, Nottingham Forest on the verge of play-off contention, the ice floes beginning to break up on the Trent, students shedding their furry parkas and starting to sit on the grass….

And what better way to spend your time than to check into to the East Midlands Conference Centre at the end of April for the BGS Spring Meeting? Even better, stay at the eco-friendly Orchard Hotel next door and barely have to move for 3 days. The programme has been finalised, and booking is in full swing! I’ve even forgiven them for spelling my name wrong in the advertising booklet.

I have been (peripherally) involved in the organisation of this event, which has been led by my colleague Rowan Harwood form Nottingham and the BGS events team; it’s the first time I have worked with the BGS on something of this kind. The planning for the event started about 2 years ago, so clearly a lot of time and thought has gone into the final agenda. The programme has got something for everyone and most people will probably be interested in quite a lot of the sessions. I’m of course pleased to see that there’s a whole day for the Dementia Special Interest Group but also a session on the first morning of the main conference about aggression, with three top class psychiatrists/psychologists.

My own contribution is to co-facilitate a workshop on The Geriatrician as Manager, with Stephen Fowlie, who is the Medical Director of Nottingham University Hospitals NHS Trust. He’s the real deal, being a current MD (as opposed to being an ex, in my case) and a real geriatrician (as opposed to a psycho-, as in my case). Why have we suggested this session, and what relevance has it alongside topics like falls, respiratory disease, infections and so on?

Everyone probably has their own thoughts on doctors and management, but in many ways management and clinical medicine are inseparable. In almost every case, it’s not just us doctors dealing with individual patients and their families. There are hosts of other people, especially in the typical geriatric medicine scenario of multiple complex morbidity, where the outcomes are damage limitation or end of life care, rather than cure and restitution of full function. Some of these others are members of your own clinical team, but many of them are not. They include the support staff in the hospital, for example cleaners, caterers and porters, but also (obviously indirectly!) the finance team and ultimately the Trust Board. These latter folk help to determine the success of the hospital, dealing with commissioners, regulators, the media and the public, and these things in turn influence what your hospital is like to work in.

The job of the doctor starts with assessing and treating patients as they are admitted, and extends beyond this into the relationship that they have with their clinical team. But it goes further: what we do at the coal face gets translated into the data supplying both the people who buy our services (commissioners) and those who oversee them (regulators, the CQC in particular). There is no clear cut-off point dividing our clinical activity and these other processes. Some doctors relish the complexity and the challenge of dealing with hospital systems: they may  for example show an aptitude for the politics, or they may see engaging with management tasks as a potent way to get things done. It is this area that Stephen and I will be looking to explore in our workshop, and we look forward to meeting you in Nottingham

Photo credit: 3dpete via flickr.

Empowering Allied Health Professionals – opportunity to attend valuable conference

Empowering allied health professionals to transform health and care services

 

THIS OPPORTUNITY HAS NOW CLOSED – a successful applicant has been chosen.

Thanks to everyone for getting in touch!

See here for this conference, which is of interest to all AHPs

 

The British Geriatrics Society is offering a free place at the above conference for an allied health professional, as an opportunity for personal development and to help share the learning from this important meeting. Continue reading

Ethics and care for older people approaching the end of life – Symptoms, Choices and Dilemmas

An RCPE Symposium with live links and international web streaming

Thursday, 3 April 2014.
Royal College of Physicians of Edinburgh.
The Queen Mother Conference Centre, Edinburgh.

The care of patients approaching the end of life is once again a controversial and high profile topic. The provision of high quality care to older patients with complex health and social care needs brings a unique set of clinical and ethical challenges. Lectures and interactive case discussions will cover symptom control in chronic pain, vertebral fracture and advanced heart failure; ways of delivering advance care planning for older people in the community; ethical decision making in advanced dementia, around nutrition at the end of life, and around escalation of care. Our endowed lecture will consider how we can deliver high-quality end of life care across the health service in the post-Liverpool Care Pathway era. A series of interactive cases will allow exploration of practical approaches to ethical dilemmas at the end of life.

This symposium will be of practical value to all healthcare professionals in the multidisciplinary team caring for frail, older patients including geriatricians, primary care physicians, general physicians and specialists in palliative medicine. Attendees will improve their knowledge of symptom control in difficult conditions, improve their decision-making in challenging ethical situations including advanced dementia, and will gain perspective on the recent debate regarding the optimal organisation and delivery of end of life care in the hospital and community.

Dr Miles Witham
Chair, Organising Sub-Committee

Click here for more information