Selfie with a centenarian!

Esther Clift is a Consultant Practitioner Trainee in Frailty, and Vice Chair of the BGS nurses and AHP Council. She is undertaking a Doctorate in Clinical Practice at Southampton University on the uptake of exercise by older people. She was inspired by an interview with Dr Frankland on the Today Programme, and went to ask him about his own use of exercise.

‘I just think he should have told me, I’m not stupid!’ – Dr AW Frankland reflects on his introduction to Strength and Balance exercises.

Dr AW Frankland was born the year the Titanic sank, and started medical school in Oxford when Stanley Baldwin was Prime Minister. He was supervised by Sir Alexander Fleming at St Marys and is described as the ‘grandfather of allergy research’. His daily hour long supervisions with Fleming never included discussing patients – ‘he was a pure scientist, who wanted to talk about science.’ Continue reading

Some things in life are free!

Cliff Kilgore is a Consultant Nurse for Intermediate Care and Older People within Dorset Healthcare NHS Trust and he is also a Visiting Fellow to Bournemouth University. He is Chair of the BGS Nurses and Allied Healthcare Professionals Council. He also is a member of the BGS Clinical Quality Steering Group. He tweets @kilgore_cliff

Many of our readers will know that the BGS has been at the forefront of promoting older people’s healthcare and wellbeing for many years. In fact, we celebrated 70 years of this in March. Leading the way for older people has enabled the BGS to have great influence on many aspects of policy and guidance including Fit for Frailty, The Silver Book, Comprehensive Geriatric Assessment (CGA), as well as ever increasing influence on training and development of all clinicians. The BGS has long recognised the importance of developing trainees and to support this has offered many benefits to its members including free membership for medical students and foundation doctors, study grants and sponsorship and support of research projects. Continue reading

Can Irish set dancing benefit your health?

Joanne Shanahan is a Chartered Physiotherapist and Irish set dancing teacher. She completed her PhD in the University of Limerick. Joanne was the lead co-author of “Set dancing for people with Parkinson’s disease: an information resource for Irish set dancing teachers”. In this blog Joanne discusses her research.

irishSet dancing is an Irish cultural and social dance form. It involves dancing in a group of eight (sometimes four) people and is accompanied by the lively distinct beat of Irish dance music. Today set dancing is enjoyed by people worldwide with classes, workshops and ceilis organised all year round. Until recently the health benefits of set dancing were unknown. Recent Age and Aging publications by Shanahan et al. (2016), presented at the Irish Gerontology Society Annual Meeting 2016, have informed this question. Continue reading

Paramedics; Frailty detection and admission avoidance

Dr Amy Heskett works as a Speciality Doctor within the West Kent Urgent Care Home Treatment Service. This team aims to prevent hospital admissions by working alongside GPs, nurses, carers and paramedics to provide a holistic management plan. She writes a blog about her experiences on her blog communitydoctoramy.wordpress.com and can be found on twitter @mrsapea

paramedics-photoThe West Kent Home Treatment Service provides home-based medical treatments to avoid hospital admissions when appropriate. Referrals come from GPs, Community Nurses and Paramedics; but more importantly our team widens as soon as we start to work with patients, their family and carers.

A day of referrals began with a call from a Paramedic who had attended V after she had fallen in her bedroom, but luckily sustained no injury. This was on a background of dementia and the need for daily support from her son to assist with meals, prompt medications and support trips made outside the home. V’s only other medical history was that of hypertension and one fall a year ago. V was normally able to get herself to the toilet and used a stick to mobilise slowly indoors; while carers attended once a day to provide personal care. Continue reading

Esther Clift’s African Blog Series; Part 1 ‘Superstition’

Esther Clift is a Consultant Practitioner Trainee in Frailty with Health Education Wessex. This is the first part of a four part BGS blog series about her time in Africa. She tweets @EstherClift

Evidence of superstition is everywhere in Nairobi. The lampposts are plastered with posters of a certain ‘Doctor’ offering help with relationships, ‘manliness’, and money issues. On payment of a significant sum- starting at about £30, and upwards, various incantations, and ‘luck’ potions are generated and taken. The internet is full of stories of how people’s situations have changed immediately after taking their potions, or using incantations, such as ‘I was immediately able to clinch the deal which had been hanging around for months’, and so on. Continue reading

Making it happen! An Acute Clinical Team in action

Firdaus Adenwalla is a consultant geriatrician in ABM University Health Board.  He is part of the Neath Port Talbot Acute Clinical Team providing an intermediate care service for the community. 

The media reminds us daily of how our health service is not keeping pace with our changing world. The negativity around health care, hospitals overflowing, not enough doctors, not enough nurses, GP practices closing, and the list goes on. Increasing demand, improved technology and our increased life expectancy, all compound the notion that our health service cannot meet our needs. Continue reading

Blue lights and sirens; A Paramedic’s perspective of caring for older people

Duncan Robertson is a Consultant Paramedic with the North West Ambulance Service. He has an interest in falls and frailty and a research interest in the lived experience of frailty in the 999 population. He tweets @NWAMB_Duncan

DuncanIf, like me, you spent your formative years watching Saturday night television on the BBC, you may have a particular view of the ambulance service.  Through popular dramas and fly on the wall documentaries more people than ever have an insight into the work of the Paramedic.  We deal in saving lives; we come to you when you have had a road traffic collision, a stroke or a heart attack, we perform heroic resuscitation, we treat stabbings, shootings, assaults and intoxicated revellers on weekend nights.  We use blue lights and sirens, arrive by ambulance, response car, motorcycle, bicycle or helicopter and we must see some sights…or so we are told! Continue reading

Why do allied health professionals need to be empowered?

Esther Clift is a Clinical Specialist Physiotherapist in Southampton, and a BGS member. In December she attended a conference for allied health professionals at The King’s Fund, chaired by BGS President David Oliver.

Last month, The King’s Fund put on a well subscribed event entitled ‘Empowering Allied Health Professionals to Transform Health and Care Services’.

That title set me wondering: why would we need to be empowered? After all, AHPs like me already make up a significant proportion of the health and social care workforce. 172,686 of us are registered with the Health and Care Professions Council, and yet it seems we are often lumped into an amorphous group of ‘doctors and nurses’ who deliver health care.

Is that just because too few people (even those who should know better) can name more than three or four of the twelve professions under the ‘allied’ banner?  Do we have a crisis of identity?

Continue reading