A generation of Doctors unable to look after their patients?

Dr Anthony James is a Consultant Physician at Princess of Wales Hospital. 

There have been many changes in recent years. The patients are older with more frailty, multiple comorbidities and a mixture of social and medical issues. These patients are often described as ‘complex’, making them sound as if they are something special. The reality is that they are now the norm and everybody should be able to deal with the norm. These problems are recognised by Royal College of Physicians in Hospitals on the Edge? The time for action (2012);

‘All hospital inpatients deserve to receive safe, high-quality, sustainable care centered around their needs and delivered in an appropriate setting by respectful, compassionate, expert health professionals. Yet it is increasingly clear that our hospitals are struggling to cope with the challenge of an ageing population and increasing hospital admissions.’ Continue reading

Advanced Professionals supporting our frail patients, but how?

Beverley Marriott is an Advanced Nurse Practitioner working in the Birmingham community healthcare foundation trust. She is also a King’s College Older Person Fellow. She tweets @bevbighair

Nationally there is increasing recognition of the needs of frail older people in health systems, and  the UK’s rapidly ageing population will only increase in the years to come.

Dr Ram Byravan (Consultant and Clinical Director Heart of England Elderly Care) states that the prevalence of multimorbidity is on the rise, with 44% of people over 75 now living with more than one long-term condition –  geriatricians and GPs are uniquely suited to lead the response to the challenges of caring for this group. Continue reading

Comprehensive Geriatric Assessment and the role it plays in improving care delivered to the older person

Dr Diarmuid O’Shea is a Consultant Geriatrician at St Vincent’s University Hospital Dublin, and Clinical Lead for the National Clinical Programme of Older People in Ireland.  

Ms. Carmel Hoey is a Nursing & Midwifery Planning and Development Officer at the NMPD Unit, Galway, and HSE Service Planner for the National Clinical Programme of Older People in Ireland. 

Countries around the world are seeing significant growth in the numbers of people living longer and healthier lives. We all need to reflect proactively on how we can best maximise the intergenerational benefits this will undoubtedly bring and we must also address the challenges it will generate.

Ireland is no different, with a substantial growth evident in our older population. The number of people aged over 65 years increased by 14% between 2006 and 2011. An increase of 17% is predicted between 2011 and 2016, and a further 17% is expected by 2021 (Central Statistics Office, 2013). Continue reading

If frailty is viewed by some as a “commissioning Trojan Horse” this should be admitted

Dr Shibley Rahman is currently an academic physician in dementia and frailty. His contribution on the diagnosis of behavioural frontal frontotemporal dementia, published while he was a M.B./Ph.D. student at Cambridge in 1999, is considered widely to be an important contribution to the field, even cited in the Oxford Textbook of Medicine. Here he responds to Steve Parry’s recent BGS blog, The Frailty Industry: Too Much Too Soon?  He tweets at @dr_shibley.

In response to Steve Parry’s recent BGS blog, The Frailty Industry: Too Much Too Soon?, I would simply in this article like to set out some of the strengths and weaknesses in the conceptualisation of frailty, with some pointers about “where now?

There is, actually, no international consensus definition of frailty (although there is one of a related term “cognitive frailty”).

In a world of fierce competition for commissioning, and equally intense political lobbying in health and social care, the danger is that a poorly formulated notion becomes merely a “Trojan Horse” for commissioning.

I must humbly depart from the views of some colleagues – for me, frailty is not just a word. I could likewise point to other single words which cause gross offence, which are unrepeatable in my blogpost here. Continue reading

The Frailty Industry: Too Much Too Soon?

Steve Parry works in acute medicine and older people’s medicine. He has a special interest in investigation and treatment of falls and blackouts in adult patients of all ages. He is BGS Vice President – Academic and Research.

Fashions come and go, in clothing, news and even movie genres. Medicine, including geriatric medicine, is no exception. When I was a trainee, falls and syncope was the next big thing, pursued with huge enthusiasm by a few who became the many. But when does a well-meaning medical fashion become a potentially destructive fad? Frailty, quite rightly, has developed from something geriatricians and allied professionals always did to become a buzz word even neurosurgeons bandy about. No bad thing for all professionals who see older people to have awareness of the recognition and management of this vulnerable and resource intensive patient group. Continue reading

The Challenges of Research in the Care Home Setting

Annabelle Long is a Chartered Physiotherapist working as a Research Assistant at the University of Nottingham on a Dunhill Medical Trust funded PEACH study, which considers the role of Comprehensive Geriatric Assessment in UK care homes. She has a developing research interest in wellbeing for people with dementia in community environments. In this blog she outlines the potential challenges and solutions in doing research at the health and social care interface.

As practitioners and researchers in care of older people, it is important for us to be continually working to include more dependent groups in research. The reason for doing so is to ensure that the evidence base can reliably be applied to the patients we see in everyday practice. However involving older people with dependency in research can be challenging because cognitive and physical impairments can make standard procedures for recruitment and data collection difficult. Continue reading

What has CGA ever done for us?

Graham Ellis discusses the NIHR funded research project looking into the effectiveness of Comprehensive Geriatric Assessments. As part of the project an extensive Delphi exercise is being undertaken which will include staff, patients carers and researchers.  As part of the Delphi exercise a CGA consensus meeting will be held at the BGS Autumn Meeting in Glasgow on the 24th November at 9:30-13:30.

seccWe are used to the idea that CGA is effective.  That still leaves us with a few problems.  Who does CGA help?  How does CGA help?  What are the crucial elements that make it effective?  Are wards better than teams and how can we be sure?

The challenge with black box interventions (complex interventions of multiple parts) is properly understanding the component parts and how they relate to each other.  If you don’t know how something works it can be hard to replicate it or even to improve on it.   Continue reading

Geriatric conditions, are they recognized as relevant problems by community dwelling older people?

Marjon van Rijn is a PhD candidate at the department of Geriatric Medicine in the Academic Medical Center in Amsterdam and lecturer at the School of Nursing, Faculty of Health, Amsterdam University of Applied Sciences the Netherlands. In this blog she comments on her recent paper in Age and Ageing.

aaComprehensive Geriatric Assessment (CGA) is increasingly implemented in community care settings and involves an assessment of physical, psychological, functional and social geriatric conditions, such as urinary incontinence, memory problems, fall risk and loneliness.

In this study, CGA is part of a complex intervention to prevent disability in community dwelling older people. Older people with an increased risk of functional decline, according to the Identification of Seniors at Risk questionnaire that was validated for primary care, were invited for a CGA at home. A community care registered nurse visited older persons to conduct the CGA, and if necessary, made an individual care plan with several follow up visits. Continue reading

Comprehensive Geriatric Assessment in Primary Care

Lynn Lansbury is NIHR CLAHRC Principal Investigator in Academic Geriatric Medicine at the University of Southampton. Here she talks about CGA in Primary Care, which she shares on Twitter @CGA_GP

GP SurgeryAdam Gordon’s blog introduced a timely study. With an ageing population it is important that we develop services that are fit for the changing demographic. There is convincing evidence that Comprehensive Geriatric Assessment (CGA) has a place in best practice for the care of older people. The evidence base is particularly strong in acute settings and studies have also been carried out in people’s homes. The Proactive Healthcare for Older People in Care Home (PEACH) study explores CGA in care homes Thus there is interest in identifying the place of CGA in other settings. Our new study, Comprehensive Geriatric Assessment in Primary Care (CGA-GP): The Fit for Later Life Project funded by NIHR CLAHRC Wessex, investigates the GP surgery as a setting. Continue reading

Can Comprehensive Geriatric Assessment make a difference to care home residents?  

Adam Gordon is Clinical Associate Professor in Medicine of Older People at the University of Nottingham, a visiting Professor at City University London and an Honorary Consultant Geriatrician at Derby Teaching Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust.  He tweets @adamgordon1978.  Here he talks about a new research project considering the value of CGA in care home residents

Comprehensive Geriatric Assessment (CGA) works. At least, it does when performed in an inpatient setting in an acute hospital. This has been shown over numerous systematic reviews and meta-analyses to be the case.  Older people with frailty who receive CGA experience better outcomes in terms of functional status, cognition, readmissions to hospital and numbers of days spent at home.

Continue reading