Why the BGS Fringe?

Muna Al Jawad is a Consultant Geriatrician at Royal Sussex County Hospital in Brighton. Here she discusses the BGS Fringe which will be taking place at the BGS Autumn Meeting in London on 23 November. She tweets @OPWhisperer

The idea for the BGS Fringe comes from an emotion: Frustration, and a cause: Resistance. Frustration first. I realise this might be heresy (especially on a blog for the BGS) but the national conference really frustrates me. Geriatricians are the funniest, quirkiest and most humble of doctors. Lots of us chose geriatrics because we want to work with geriatricians. Of all the hospital specialists, we pride ourselves on being the most holistic, we see aim to see our patients as human beings, within their network of family and carers. “Aha!” the geriatrician will say on a ward round, “I know Mrs Jones, she loves Elvis and has a watch with a cat on it” (I actually said that last week).
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The frailty journey so far: where are we heading?

Professor Martin Vernon qualified in 1988 in Manchester. Following training in the North West he moved to East London to train in Geriatric Medicine where he also acquired an MA in Medical Ethics and Law from King’s College. In 2016 Martin was appointed National Clinical Director for Older People and Person Centred Integrated Care at NHS England. Here he discusses the 3rd National Frailty Conference which will be held on 28 September 2017 in Leeds. He tweets @runnermandoc 

The 19th Century term ‘watershed’ refers to a ridge of high ground separating bodies of water flowing in different directions. With this in mind I believe the 3rd National Frailty Conference in Leeds this year truly does mark a watershed moment. It will provide a valuable and timely opportunity both to reflect and add clarity to the new direction of travel we are taking with routine frailty identification and intervention for older people on a national scale. Make no mistake: bringing frailty into the mainstream is game changing.

Over the last year I have been continually impressed by the enthusiasm, ingenuity and commitment around the country focused on improving care and outcomes for our expanding and ageing population.  As a health and care system collectively we have much to celebrate from the hard work already done. Continue reading

Half the people in the world with Parkinson’s Disease have probably not been diagnosed – yet…

Richard Walker is a Consultant Geriatrician at North Tyneside General Hospital, and Honorary Professor of Ageing and International Health at Newcastle University. He has a research interest in non-communicable diseases in sub-Saharan Africa (SSA) and is Associate International Director for SSA for the Royal College of Physicians, London. He is the Clinical Lead for the Northumbria / Kilimanjaro Christian Medical Centre health link and Chair of the Movement Disorders Society African Task Force. In this blog article he discusses the growing challenge of Parkinson’s Disease in SSA.

I’ve recently got back from the 21st International Congress of Parkinson’s Disease (PD) and Movement Disorders in Vancouver where I chaired the African Task Force meeting. At the congress it was exciting to hear about all the new developments in the field, but it was perhaps unsurprising that there was very little research about the treatment of PD in lower and middle income countries (LMICs). Continue reading

Autumn Speakers Series: What is geriatric rehabilitation? Towards a unifying concept

Romke van Balen is an Elderly Care Physician in Rotterdam and Senior Researcher in Leiden. His main field of interest is geriatric rehabilitation. He will be speaking at the upcoming BGS Autumn Meeting in London.

Although geriatric rehabilitation in most countries is considered to belong to the core tasks of geriatricians, there is no consensus about definition and target groups of patients.

Decades ago, the Boston Working Group defined geriatric rehabilitation as a multidisciplinary set of evaluative, diagnostic and therapeutic interventions whose purpose it is to restore functional ability or enhance residual functional capacity in elderly people with disabling impairments. When looking at this definition, one wonders if it separates geriatric rehabilitation from the general aim of geriatric medicine. Only palliative care clearly has another aim. Continue reading

Autumn Speakers Series: Is it just me… or have we listened and changed?

Sharon Blackburn has worked in the independent care sector for over 28 years, having previously spent 10 years in the NHS in a variety of roles. Sharon is currently Policy and Communications Director for the National Care Forum. She was awarded an CBE in the 2016 New Year’s Honours for services to nursing and the not-for-profit care sector. She tweets at @NCFSharon She will be speaking at the upcoming BGS Autumn Meeting in London.

Care Homes routinely feature in the press and not always for the right reasons. Sadly the negative experiences and stories do little to help us all promote the amazing work that is being done with people who live in care homes up and down the country. Instead it feeds peoples’ already distorted views and understanding, including those of professionals. Andrea Sutcliffe, Chief Inspector for adult social care at the Care Quality Commission (CQC) talks about the ‘mum’ test – “would this service be good enough for my mum?” I would suggest the ‘mum’ test needs to be more up close and personal… “would this service be acceptable to me”? Continue reading

Autumn Speakers Series: A glimpse into the future of acute care for older people; innovation, connectivity, transformation

Professor Roger Wong is Executive Associate Dean, Education in the Faculty of Medicine, University of British Columbia (UBC). He is a consultant geriatrician at Vancouver General Hospital, where he founded the Acute Care for Elders (ACE) unit that is replicated across Canada and internationally. He tweets at @RogerWong10 and is a key opinion leader in geriatrics and ageing. In this blog article he discusses the determinants that can transform the future of acute care for older people. He will be speaking at the upcoming BGS Autumn Meeting in London.

For all of us who work with seniors in the hospital setting, we often wonder what the future holds for acute care for older people. While our crystal ball may appear blurry on some of the exact details, we can certainly take a sneak preview now on three determinants that can change and shape the future of acute care geriatrics.

First, disruptive innovation in the medical sciences has already begun to transform the delivery of healthcare in seniors. Take cancer for example, which affects a significant number of older people every year. Continue reading

Autumn Speakers Series: Benchmarking Practice in UK Long-term care, can we make it work?

Adam Gordon is Clinical Associate Professor in Medicine of Older People at the University of Nottingham and a Consultant Geriatrician at Derby Teaching Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust. He is a specialist advisor to the East Midlands Academic Health Sciences Network Patient Safety Collaborative on Care Homes and will be speaking at the upcoming BGS Autumn Meeting in London. He tweets at @adamgordon1978

Contrary to what might be gleaned from the lay media, the quality of care received by residents in care homes – whether from care home or National Health Service staff – is frequently exceptional.  Care home residents are amongst the most complex recipients of care within the health and social care system and so they can stretch even the most capable and dedicated of staff. It is therefore, perhaps, unsurprising that things do not always go to plan – even in the best of homes. There are also, undoubtedly, examples of care homes where things go wrong more frequently – where shortcomings in care are not so much sporadic, as systematic. This is unacceptable. Continue reading

Spring Speakers Series: Why mouth care matters?

Jessica Mann, Dental Core Trainee and Mili Doshi, Special Care Consultant. Mili Doshi will be speaking at BGS Spring Meeting in Gateshead

Did you know there are more bacteria living in your mouth than there are people in the world?  The mouth is biggest hole in the body – it is highly visible, we eat though it, talk through it and smile with it, but when we need help caring for it, often that help is not there! Yet deteriorating oral health can have severe consequences for the rest of the body…

If you have a problem with your vision a doctor will check your eyes, but if you are not eating is it common practice for a doctor or nurse to check if there are problems with the mouth?  Continue reading

Spring Speakers Series: Denture Loss

Mili Doshi, clinical lead for Mouth Care Matters, discusses the impact of denture loss. She will be speaking at BGS Spring Meeting in Gateshead.

As a hospital dentist it’s always a heart sink moment when you get the referral from the ward that reads, “Mrs X has lost her dentures, please could you replace them”. If only it was that easy…

Mrs X has not only lost her dentures, but also the ability to eat her meals, communicate clearly, smile at her family and potentially, her dignity.

It is normally a similar story. Mrs X had fallen asleep and her dentures weren’t there when she woke up, she had wrapped them in some tissue to keep them clean, safe or left them on her meal tray.  One way or another they were accidentally mistaken for rubbish and disposed of. She had been in hospital for days yet no one had asked if she had dentures and therefore she wasn’t provided with a denture pot to keep them clean. Continue reading

Spring Speakers Series: Getting it Wrong? Technologies and Telehealth for an Ageing Population

Dr Malcolm J. Fisk is a Senior Research Fellow at the Centre for Computing and Responsible Research, De Montfort University, Leicester. He will be speaking at BGS Spring Meeting in Gateshead.

Most of the readers of this blog can look forward to a healthy and long(ish) life. The likely quality of that life is, of course, open to debate and depends on a number of factors. One of these factors is concerned with the accessibility and usability of many of the technologies through which we’ll be able to keep engaged (and, yes, that does include working into our older age). Another factor relates to our use of sometimes specialist technologies that can help us with our ailing bodies or minds.    Continue reading