Older HIV-Infected Adults are Geriatricians’ Business

Fátima Brañas is a consultant geriatrician and the clinical lead for orthogeriatrics at the Infanta Leonor University Hospital in Madrid (Spain). She holds a PhD, specializing in HIV infection in older adults, and is working hard in this field—from both a clinical and a research point of view—to provide all the benefits of a geriatric assessment for older HIV-infected adults. She recently co-authored ‘Frailty and physical function in older HIV-infected adults @FatimaBranas

hivThe HIV-infected population is aging due to the success of combination antiretroviral therapy, which prolongs survival, and also because of the growing number of newly diagnosed cases in older adults. Nowadays, over half of people infected with HIV are older than fifty years, which is the age cutoff accepted by the scientific community to consider someone an HIV-infected older adult. Fifty is only their chronological age, but biologically they are older, as accelerated aging in this population has been demonstrated. So, it seems that in the coming years, HIV care is going to be focused on a growing group of older adults and their specific problems. This means more than only survival, infection control, or avoiding the adverse events caused by antiretroviral drugs; it also includes consideration of comorbidities, polypharmacy, functional decline, and geriatric syndromes. Continue reading

Desperately Seeking Ethics: Reflections on attending a research ethics committee meeting

Liz Charalambous is a nurse and PhD student. She tweets at @lizcharalambou and is a regular guest blogger for the BGS.

me-fbI am in the second year of a PhD researching volunteers in dementia and acute hospitals. The project came about as part of my clinical work as a staff nurse in older person acute care. It was while working on a prevention of delirium research study, I realised that volunteers could play an important role.

The first year of my PhD has been spent mainly completing modules and designing the project from scratch. I have lost track of how many drafts of countless documents have been sent to my long suffering supervisors as they guide me towards refining my ideas, sifting through my thousands of words to put together a robust study which will stand up to scrutiny. Continue reading

Frequent sauna bathing protects men against dementia

Jari Laukkanen is a professor at the University of Eastern Finland. He and his co-authors have recently published a research paper in Age and Ageing journal on the link between sauna bathing and memory diseases. You can follow him on twitter @LaukkanenJari

saunaFrequent sauna bathing can reduce the risk of dementia, according to a 20-year follow-up study.  Men taking a sauna 4–7 times a week were 66% less likely to be diagnosed with dementia than those taking a sauna once a week. The association between sauna bathing and dementia risk has not been previously investigated.

The effects of sauna bathing on the risk of Alzheimer’s disease and other forms of dementia were studied in the Kuopio Ischemic Heart Disease Risk Factor Study (KIHD), involving more than 2,000 middle-aged men living in the eastern part of Finland. Continue reading

How do geriatricians improve outcomes after hip fracture?

Jenny Neuburger is a Senior Research Analyst at the Nuffield Trust  (@NuffieldTrust) and a Visiting Research Fellow at the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine. She and her co-authors have recently published research in Age and Ageing journal.

hipWe have just published a paper showing that geriatrician involvement in hip fracture care can improve patient outcomes.  Patients treated on wards with higher numbers of geriatrician hours tended to have lower mortality within the 30 days after presentation.

We measured geriatrician hours worked in orthopaedic departments using data collected via the National Hip Fracture Database annual survey each year from 2010 to 2013 for English hospitals.  Over this period, geriatrician hours increased from 1.5 to 4.0 hours per patient, reflecting investments made in response the financial incentives introduced under the Best Practice Tariff scheme. Continue reading

A New Holistic Approach to Pain Management in Older People

Nan Ma is specialist registrar in clinical Gerontology and Aza Abdulla is a consultant geriatrician and general physician at the Princess Royal University Hospital, Kings College NHS Foundation Trust. He is co-founder of the Special Interest Group on Pain in Older People in the British Geriatrics Society (BGS) and participated in producing the first National Guidelines on Management of Pain in Older People. He is also the immediate past president of the Geriatrics & Gerontology Section at the Royal Society of Medicine.

painPain in older people is under-reported and often poorly appreciated. For many, it is seen as part of normal ageing and has to be accepted. It is also a subjective feeling (different people have different pain thresholds) making it difficult for the clinician to quantify its impact in an individual patient. Consequently, it may be overlooked as an important factor that can affect older people’s wellbeing. In fact, chronic pain has a huge influence on quality of life (QoL) through its effects on the physical and mental state, which in turn adversely impacts on the older individual’s economic and social status (effects on carers, friends and family). Inadequately controlled pain perpetuates disability, anxiety, and depression all interfering with the overall QoL. It follows that effective management of pain is crucial in optimising welfare in the older person. Continue reading

Hospital discharge – everyone loses when its handled poorly

Dr Tom Nutt is Chief Executive of Healthwatch Essex and Dr Oonagh Corrigan led the hospital discharge research as Commissioning and Research Manager. Dr Alex Georgiadis is currently Acting Research and Commissioning Manager at Healthwatch Essex and co-authored the study. Healthwatch Essex tweets at @HWEssex

dischargeA major two-year research study undertaken by Healthwatch Essex into the experiences of patients discharged from three hospitals in the county has provided a comprehensive picture of this thorny issue. The report encourages local health and social care commissioners to overcome artificial boundaries and develop a unifying vision of care to provide high quality care.

The report, published at the end of last year, marks the organisation’s most ambitious project to date, involving almost 200 hours of observation and over 200 interviews with patients, staff, and family carers. Continue reading

Developing new guidance on how to measure lying and standing blood pressure- harder than you think!

Shelagh O’Riordan is a consultant geriatrician and the clinical lead for the National Audit of Inpatient  Falls. She was an acute hospital geriatrician in Canterbury in Kent for 14 years but moved in September 2016 to work Kent Community Foundation Trust as a community geriatrician. She developed and runs East Kent Falls and Osteoporosis service. She tweets at @jupiterhouse1  

bpAs the clinical lead for the National Audit of Inpatient Falls (NAIF) I have been involved in the development of some new tools to standardise fall prevention in hospitals and they are being launched this month. The first of these was launched on 13/01/17 and is on the measurement of lying and standing blood pressure.

One of the results we found in the last audit round (data collected May 2015) was that on average only 16% of patients over 65y in an acute hospital after 48 hours had had a lying and standing BP recorded! I found this to be a fairly shockingly low number. I’m known, like many geriatricians, to be a bit obsessed with measuring lying and standing BP. Continue reading

Cause of death? Dementia…

Professor Emma Reynish is a consultant physician in Geriatric Medicine at Edinburgh Royal Infirmary, and Professor of Dementia Research, at the University of Stirling where she leads the dementia and social gerontology research group.

dementiaIn England and Wales more people now die of dementia and/or Alzheimer’s disease than anything else. A similar picture is most likely to exist for the other devolved nations of the UK. For healthcare professionals who are involved in the management of people with dementia, this news offers the opportunity for reflection and action. What does this mean for us and our approach to the older population? Continue reading

Hypertension and dementia: exploring the evidence

Jenni Harrison is a Clinical Research Fellow at The University of Edinburgh. Her previous role was as an Academic Clinical Fellow in Geriatric Medicine in Leicester. She was part of the Hypertension in Dementia (HIND) Research Group at the Universities of Nottingham and Leicester. The group recently produced a New Horizons article on the management of hypertension in people with dementia. She tweets @JenniKHarrison.

deerIn the face of uncertainty around the optimal management of hypertension in people with dementia we sought to review and summarise the available evidence. After first considering the rationale for the treatment of hypertension and possible reasons why the approach could be different for those with dementia, we structured our review around three key questions:

(1) Do people with dementia experience greater adverse effects from antihypertensive medications?

(2) Is cognitive function protected or worsened by controlling blood pressure?

(3) Are there subgroups of people with dementia for whom antihypertensive therapy is more likely to be harmful? Continue reading

Planning for our new BGS website… Have your say!

survey-2Calling all BGS Members and friends! We are inviting you to complete this survey to help us find out more about what our members, and other visitors, are looking for from the new BGS website which will replace the current main BGS site.

This survey should take no longer than 5 – 10 minutes to complete, depending in the length of your answers. This survey also provides the opportunity to join the Website Consultation Group and/or volunteer to review and update existing materials from the current site. Continue reading