Spring Speakers Series: Getting it Wrong? Technologies and Telehealth for an Ageing Population

Dr Malcolm J. Fisk is a Senior Research Fellow at the Centre for Computing and Responsible Research, De Montfort University, Leicester. He will be speaking at BGS Spring Meeting in Gateshead.

Most of the readers of this blog can look forward to a healthy and long(ish) life. The likely quality of that life is, of course, open to debate and depends on a number of factors. One of these factors is concerned with the accessibility and usability of many of the technologies through which we’ll be able to keep engaged (and, yes, that does include working into our older age). Another factor relates to our use of sometimes specialist technologies that can help us with our ailing bodies or minds.    Continue reading

Innovative digital technology; A truly viable option for our older patients?

Esther Clift is a Consultant Practitioner Trainee in Frailty with Health Education Wessex @EstherClift

Telemedicine_ConsultWe are facing unprecedented times in the NHS. Those of us working from within, we know only too well that the demands and pressures mean we need to do things differently, in a cost efficient way, while safeguarding quality and standards of patient care. Digital technology has been heralded as the panacea for our situation, with telecare, telemedicine and telehealth offering viable alternatives to our reduced staffing, and pressured workloads. Digital is non judgmental and non discriminatory. Continue reading

Award Winning Telehealth

Chief Executive of Airedale NHS Foundation Trust; Bridget Fletcher discusses how this Yorkshire Hospital is delivering unique, new and bespoke video consultation services to support patients in their own home and preventing unnecessary admissions to ED and inpatient beds.telehealth

Overburdened A&E departments and hospital wards full to capacity are almost daily news items currently.  It is likely that the individual human stories behind those news items involve very many people over the age of 65 living with one or more long term conditions.  In fact statisticians tell us around 70% of our NHS resources in general are spent caring for patients living with long term conditions, much of which is re-active care rather than proactive. Continue reading

Cyber-care – The benefits and drawbacks of new technology

A conference report from the BGS Spring Meeting in Belfast, by Liz Gill.telecare

The benefits – and some drawbacks – of new technology was the subject of the BGS Special Interest Group for Telecare and Telehealth where Dr Frank Miskelly, consultant physician at Imperial College London, had this key message for his audience. “The secret is to look at the problem and then ask how you can use technology to solve it.  Too often you get companies who want to sell you some kit saying ‘we’ve got the solution, can you now find the problem?’” Continue reading

The Technological Revolution and its place in teaching Geriatric Medicine

Laura Daunt is an ST5 from the East Midlands North Deanery and is Education and Training representative on the BGS Trainees Council

Much is written about the time pressures on modern medical student curricula. Geriatric medicine, in particular, has the challenge of conveying the complex needs of our elderly patients and the necessity of a problem solving approach. This type of complex decision-making is perhaps best taught face-to-face with real multi-disciplinary teams and the patients they serve. However, there is also a great deal of material to get through if students are going to develop a proper theoretical underpinning to the skills they need to manage older patients.

One way to use face-to-face teaching time more constructively is to use computer aided learning (CAL) in addition to traditional teaching methods. This frees up face-to-face teaching time so that it can be used where it is most needed.  The approach is known as blended learning. Continue reading