Who is at greatest risk of dying after a broken hip?

Toby Smith is a Lecturer in Physiotherapy at the Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, University of East Anglia. His recent paper published in Age and Ageing has identified those people who are at greatest risk of dying following a broken hip. He tweets at @tobyosmith.shutterstock_158328935

Hip fracture is a major challenge for health services worldwide, and can be catastrophic for the individual who experiences it, in addition to their friends, family and carers. The consequences of a broken hip can range from physical disability through reduced mobility and loss of independence, to death. It has been estimated that approximately 25% to 40% of people following a hip fracture die within the first 12 months after their injury. This has been, in part, attributed to the fact that many of these people are older and have numerous medical conditions which place them at greater risk of death irrespective of their hip fracture.

Given this high risk and the large number of people who experience a hip fracture annually, our team aimed to identify characteristics which could predict who would be at greatest risk of dying following a hip fracture. Continue reading

For he’s a jolly good fellow…

David Shipway is a final year registrar in geriatric medicine working at London’s Charing Cross and St Mary’s Hospitals, Imperial College NHS Trust. He is currently developing a new comprehensive surgical liaison service for patients undergoing gastrointestinal surgery.shutterstock_154668242

With population ageing, the number of oldest old undergoing surgery is increasing markedly. For anyone who’s recently been the medical registrar on-call, it will come as no surprise to hear that there is considerable unmet need on the surgical wards of the UK. But the experience of pioneers in this field has proved that reactive post-operative care is not enough: a proactive approach immediately following the decision to operate is needed to improve outcomes for older patients undergoing surgery. Continue reading