Paramedics; Frailty detection and admission avoidance

Dr Amy Heskett works as a Speciality Doctor within the West Kent Urgent Care Home Treatment Service. This team aims to prevent hospital admissions by working alongside GPs, nurses, carers and paramedics to provide a holistic management plan. She writes a blog about her experiences on her blog communitydoctoramy.wordpress.com and can be found on twitter @mrsapea

paramedics-photoThe West Kent Home Treatment Service provides home-based medical treatments to avoid hospital admissions when appropriate. Referrals come from GPs, Community Nurses and Paramedics; but more importantly our team widens as soon as we start to work with patients, their family and carers.

A day of referrals began with a call from a Paramedic who had attended V after she had fallen in her bedroom, but luckily sustained no injury. This was on a background of dementia and the need for daily support from her son to assist with meals, prompt medications and support trips made outside the home. V’s only other medical history was that of hypertension and one fall a year ago. V was normally able to get herself to the toilet and used a stick to mobilise slowly indoors; while carers attended once a day to provide personal care. Continue reading

A Bespoke Blue Light Response to Frail Older Fallers: Makes Complete Sense – But Does It Work?

Spencer Winch is a specialist paramedic in urgent care and a trainee advanced clinical practitioner in emergency care. He has a special interest in falls and care of the frail older patient and his time is currently split between the ambulance service, the local emergency department and a masters degree in advanced clinical practice. @spencerlwinch

Anna Puddy, Kate Ellis, Gill Carlill, Josie Caffrey, Claire Wiggett and Moyra Pugh are all advanced hospital based occupational therapists specialising in emergency, acute and elderly care. @TheRealAnnaPud, @OTMoyra, @CaffreyJosie

South Western Ambulance VX09FYPWith falls in patients over the age of 65 making up 8.5% of the emergency workload locally, paramedics and the ambulance service have found themselves in a prime position to assess, treat and discharge this cohort of patients pre-hospitally. This upholds Keogh’s vision that care and treatment should be delivered closer to home without the need for hospital, and is being achieved by ambulance crews on a daily basis as highlighted in a consultant paramedic colleague’s (NWAmb_Duncan – link to BGS blog) recent blog. Higher education and degree based programmes for the paramedic profession now encourage more thorough assessment of injury and illness and thoughts around causative factors of falls, length of lie and potential for acute kidney injury. Those that are discharged on scene are then flagged to the community falls prevention teams for mobility, functionality and care assessment provided by nurse and therapists. With increasing demand on all NHS healthcare agencies, these assessments are not instantaneous and literature would suggest that those who have fallen, are likely to fall again within 24 hours without immediate intervention. Continue reading

Blue lights and sirens; A Paramedic’s perspective of caring for older people

Duncan Robertson is a Consultant Paramedic with the North West Ambulance Service. He has an interest in falls and frailty and a research interest in the lived experience of frailty in the 999 population. He tweets @NWAMB_Duncan

DuncanIf, like me, you spent your formative years watching Saturday night television on the BBC, you may have a particular view of the ambulance service.  Through popular dramas and fly on the wall documentaries more people than ever have an insight into the work of the Paramedic.  We deal in saving lives; we come to you when you have had a road traffic collision, a stroke or a heart attack, we perform heroic resuscitation, we treat stabbings, shootings, assaults and intoxicated revellers on weekend nights.  We use blue lights and sirens, arrive by ambulance, response car, motorcycle, bicycle or helicopter and we must see some sights…or so we are told! Continue reading