Antidementia medication may improve survival in Alzheimer’s disease

Dr Christoph Mueller is an Academic Clinical Lecturer at the Department of Old Age Psychiatry at King’s College London. He and his co-authors published a paper on the influence of antidementia medication on survival in Alzheimer’s disease in Age and Ageing. He tweets at @DrChrisMueller

At present Acetylcholinesterase inhibitors, as Donepezil or Rivastigmine, are the only medications available for treatment of the early stages of Alzheimer’s disease. They can slow down the progression of the illness and alleviate distressing symptoms. However, their benefits are modest and they can have side effects, such as a slow heartbeat, indigestion, weight loss or an increased risk of falls. Moreover, dementia and Alzheimer’s disease is the leading cause of death for men and women 80 years or older in England and Wales. We investigated whether being prescribed antidementia medication was associated with survival in patients with Alzheimer’s disease. Continue reading

How can hospitals empower older people with advanced disease?

Dr Lucy Selman is Cicely Saunders International Faculty Scholar in the Department of Palliative Care, Policy, and Rehabilitation at King’s College London, and a Research Fellow at the University of Bristol. In this blog Lucy discusses her recent Age and Ageing paper on an international study of patient empowerment in hospitals in London, Dublin and San Francisco (part of BuildCARE, a project led by Prof. Irene J. Higginson at King’s College London).

superheroEmpowered patients adopt healthier behaviours, use health services more cost-effectively, and experience better quality of life than patients who feel they are passive recipients of healthcare. Across the developed world, policy-makers are waking up to the benefits for patients and health services when people are encouraged to engage with clinicians, make decisions and manage their illness in a way that reflects their own values. Continue reading

Palliative care for frail older people: what, when and how?

Anna Bone is a Cicely Saunders International PhD Training Fellow in the Department of Palliative Care, Policy, and Rehabilitation at King’s College London. In this blog Anna discusses her recent Age and Ageing paper on developing a model of palliative care for frail older people. This is part of the OPTCare Elderly Study, a joint project between King’s College London and Sussex Community NHS Foundation Trust, led by Dr Catherine Evans. @AnnaEBone

aaIn the minds of many, palliative care is synonymous with cancer and end of life. This is unsurprising, as it is within this context that palliative care has developed. The goal of palliative care is to relieve suffering and improve the quality of life of people with life threatening illness. It is increasingly believed that palliative care has much to offer to other patient groups whose health is deteriorating, and not just at the end of their life.
People are now living longer, with multiple chronic illnesses and frailty, and dying at older ages. We need to consider the needs of this growing group. Specialist palliative care services for frail older people with deteriorating health may provide an extra layer of support to help them and their families live as well as possible. Continue reading

The Older Person’s Nurse Fellowship Conference 2016: Bridging the gap between research and practice through nurse-led quality improvement in older person’s services

Dr Corina Naughton, is a senior lecturer in the Florence Nightingale Faculty of Nursing and Midwifery, Kings College London. Corina is joint Lead for the Older Person’s Nurse Fellowship programme. She tweets at @corina_naughton

OPNThis was the first year of the Older Person’s Nurse Fellowship (OPNF) conference, hosted by the Florence Nightingale Faculty of Nursing and Midwifery, King’s College London, in collaboration with Health Education England (HEE). The conference brought together leading older persons’ nurse research and front-line nurse-led quality improvement initiatives undertaken by senior clinical nurses from the OPNF programme. The conference was chaired By Baroness Sally Greengross and Sir Keith Person (Chair HEE). Continue reading