Fit for Frailty

Dr Gill Turner is Vice President – Clinical Quality for the BGS and project lead for Fit for Frailty –  guidance published today on the recognition and management of older patients with frailty in community and outpatient settings. 

Frailty, or the ‘F’ word, must score as the most talked about condition over this last year. It is hard to go to any scientific meeting, participate in any discussion about health service development or even read a newspaper without encountering the  ‘ F ‘ word.

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But what does it mean?  It is likely that frailty means different things to each audience ranging from a scientific phenotype with specific outcomes in the Framingham heart study to a social description of someone in the last months of their life.

However, the real meaning of frailty for the NHS and social care is the possibility of identifying a group of older people, for whom services need to be specifically focused to improve quality and safety. The expectation is that through increasing effectiveness in proactive care, increasing efficiency and value for money will follow.

The British Geriatrics Society which represents more than 2700 UK specialists in health care for older people (doctors, nurses and allied health professionals) has produced  Best Practice Guidance for Frailty in community and outpatient settings. Under the title ‘Fit for Frailty’, it is published in 2 parts. Part 1, launched today describes the recognition and management of individuals with frailty in community and outpatient settings. Part 2 to be launched later in the summer, will describe the development, management and commissioning of services for people with frailty.

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The F word

Dr Gill Turner is Vice President – Clinical Quality for the BGS and project lead for Fit for Frailty –  guidance published today on the recognition and management of older patients with frailty in community and outpatient settings. 

Frailty, or the ‘F’ word, must score as the most talked about condition over this last year. It is hard to go to any scientific meeting, participate in any discussion about health service development or even read a newspaper without encountering the  ‘ F ‘ word.

shutterstock_136111625

But what does it mean?  It is likely that frailty means different things to each audience ranging from a scientific phenotype with specific outcomes in the Framingham heart study to a social description of someone in the last months of their life.

However, the real meaning of frailty for the NHS and social care is the possibility of identifying a group of older people, for whom services need to be specifically focused to improve quality and safety. The expectation is that through increasing effectiveness in proactive care, increasing efficiency and value for money will follow.

The British Geriatrics Society which represents more than 2700 UK specialists in health care for older people (doctors, nurses and allied health professionals) has produced  Best Practice Guidance for Frailty in community and outpatient settings. Under the title ‘Fit for Frailty’, it is published in 2 parts. Part 1, launched today describes the recognition and management of individuals with frailty in community and outpatient settings. Part 2 to be launched later in the summer, will describe the development, management and commissioning of services for people with frailty.

Continue reading