“Please remember I’m still a person!” A carer’s solution to help hospital staff provide person-centred and holistic care

Zoe Harris cared for her husband at home before his dementia reached a stage where she was unable to cope, and he spent his final months in a care home. As a result of that experience, Zoe developed a range of communication tools to ensure that carers were aware of his needs and preferences, and which have subsequently been adopted by over 1,000 care homes and home care agencies. Her latest project is Mycarematters, an online platform where people, or someone on their behalf, can upload information to help hospital staff treat the whole person and not just their medical condition. @ZoeHarrisCCUK @Mycarematters @Care_Charts_UK

When I look back, I think Geoff had been showing signs of dementia for at least eight years before his diagnosis, and it was only a matter of months after he was finally told that he had what was probably a mix of Alzheimer’s Disease and Lewy Bodies, that his condition took a turn for the worse. I had to admit defeat and he moved first to a dementia assessment ward and, three months later, to a care home for what turned out to be the final 13 months of his life. Continue reading

May issue of Age and Ageing out now

The May 2016 issue of Age and Ageing, the journal of the British Geriatrics Society is out now.

A full table of contents is available here, with editorials, research papers, reviews, short reports, case reports book reviews and more.

Hot topics this issue include:

  • Electronic frailty index
  • Exercise to reduce fear of falling
  • Involving care home residents in research
  • Patient knowledge of prescribed medicines
  • C-reactive protein, frailty and multimorbidity

The Editor’s View can be read here. Continue reading

Report from the BGS Falls and Postural Stability Meeting 2015

BGS Logo CMYKThis year’s well attended Falls and Postural Stability Conference was held in Wembley, London. BGS member Mary Ni Lochlainn reports back.

The first session at this year’s BGS Falls and Postural Stability Conference was opened by Professor Alice Nieuwbower, from University of Leuven, Belgium, who discussed falls in the context of Parkinson’s Disease (PD).

Patients with PD are twice as likely to fall, compared to healthy older adults. It seems wobbling is a major factor here with ‘sway’ more predictive of falls than ‘gait speed’ in this population. Sway-metrics (probably not as much fun as they sound) show increased sway in patients taking levodopa, leading to a therapeutic challenge for clinicians.

Continue reading