Developing new guidance on how to measure lying and standing blood pressure- harder than you think!

Shelagh O’Riordan is a consultant geriatrician and the clinical lead for the National Audit of Inpatient  Falls. She was an acute hospital geriatrician in Canterbury in Kent for 14 years but moved in September 2016 to work Kent Community Foundation Trust as a community geriatrician. She developed and runs East Kent Falls and Osteoporosis service. She tweets at @jupiterhouse1  

bpAs the clinical lead for the National Audit of Inpatient Falls (NAIF) I have been involved in the development of some new tools to standardise fall prevention in hospitals and they are being launched this month. The first of these was launched on 13/01/17 and is on the measurement of lying and standing blood pressure.

One of the results we found in the last audit round (data collected May 2015) was that on average only 16% of patients over 65y in an acute hospital after 48 hours had had a lying and standing BP recorded! I found this to be a fairly shockingly low number. I’m known, like many geriatricians, to be a bit obsessed with measuring lying and standing BP. Continue reading

Time to Up our Game (TUG) in the management of falls!

Debra Eagles is a Resident in Emergency Medicine at The Ottawa Hospital in Canada. Here she discusses her recent Age & Ageing paper.

970Your medical student reviews a case with you.  It is a 78 year old woman who presents with right knee pain subsequent to a recent fall.  The student has taken a comprehensive falls history and physical examination.  After reviewing the knee x-ray, the student summarizes the case by stating the patient suffered a mechanical fall, luckily without evidence of fracture and can be discharged home.  But wait, you say, can she safely mobilize?  The medical student smiles triumphantly, yes, she was able to use her walker to ambulate a short distance.  Excellent, you say, she can be discharged home.  But you wonder, is there anything further you can do to determine what her risk of negative outcomes associated with falling is. Continue reading

A Bespoke Blue Light Response to Frail Older Fallers: Makes Complete Sense – But Does It Work?

Spencer Winch is a specialist paramedic in urgent care and a trainee advanced clinical practitioner in emergency care. He has a special interest in falls and care of the frail older patient and his time is currently split between the ambulance service, the local emergency department and a masters degree in advanced clinical practice. @spencerlwinch

Anna Puddy, Kate Ellis, Gill Carlill, Josie Caffrey, Claire Wiggett and Moyra Pugh are all advanced hospital based occupational therapists specialising in emergency, acute and elderly care. @TheRealAnnaPud, @OTMoyra, @CaffreyJosie

South Western Ambulance VX09FYPWith falls in patients over the age of 65 making up 8.5% of the emergency workload locally, paramedics and the ambulance service have found themselves in a prime position to assess, treat and discharge this cohort of patients pre-hospitally. This upholds Keogh’s vision that care and treatment should be delivered closer to home without the need for hospital, and is being achieved by ambulance crews on a daily basis as highlighted in a consultant paramedic colleague’s (NWAmb_Duncan – link to BGS blog) recent blog. Higher education and degree based programmes for the paramedic profession now encourage more thorough assessment of injury and illness and thoughts around causative factors of falls, length of lie and potential for acute kidney injury. Those that are discharged on scene are then flagged to the community falls prevention teams for mobility, functionality and care assessment provided by nurse and therapists. With increasing demand on all NHS healthcare agencies, these assessments are not instantaneous and literature would suggest that those who have fallen, are likely to fall again within 24 hours without immediate intervention. Continue reading

Geriatricians’ Corner:- Ortho-geriatrics…..A tale of two specialities

Much akin to Charles Dickens’ famous tale of two cities, the orthopaedic bastille has been stormed with the publications of the Blue book and BOAST 1 guidelines. Supported by heavy artillery in the form of the new HRG tariff for hip fractures, the revolution has well and truly begun. Ortho-geriatric services across UK have been transformed and this has catapulted this emerging sub-speciality onto the map. As a trainee, the changes have been marked, radical and at times near miraculous. Orthopaedic junior doctors are actually taking time to document AMTS scores (Abbreviated Mini-Mental Test Score) in the admission clerk-in whilst Ortho-geriatricians are culturing a knack of looking at post-op wounds and prescribing post-op venous thrombo-prophylaxis. Continue reading