Old People’s Home for 4 Year Olds

Dr Zoe Wyrko is a Consultant physician at University Hospital Birmingham and is the Director of Workforce for the BGS. In this blog she discusses the recent Channel 4 programme in which she appeared, Old People’s Home for 4 Year Olds. She tweets @geri_baby

I’ve always had a soft spot for care homes. As a child I would occasionally go into work with my Mum and meet some of the old ladies she talked about. When I was older I started work in the same nursing home as a kitchen girl on Saturdays, and then later progressed to health care assistant. I remain proud of my training record from that time, showing I am competent to deliver personal care, clean dentures and cut nails.

This is why I was excited when an approach came from CPL productions, who were looking for geriatricians to be involved with a television programme they wanted to make about introducing children to a care home environment. Continue reading

Autumn Speakers Series: Benchmarking Practice in UK Long-term care, can we make it work?

Adam Gordon is Clinical Associate Professor in Medicine of Older People at the University of Nottingham and a Consultant Geriatrician at Derby Teaching Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust. He is a specialist advisor to the East Midlands Academic Health Sciences Network Patient Safety Collaborative on Care Homes and will be speaking at the upcoming BGS Autumn Meeting in London. He tweets at @adamgordon1978

Contrary to what might be gleaned from the lay media, the quality of care received by residents in care homes – whether from care home or National Health Service staff – is frequently exceptional.  Care home residents are amongst the most complex recipients of care within the health and social care system and so they can stretch even the most capable and dedicated of staff. It is therefore, perhaps, unsurprising that things do not always go to plan – even in the best of homes. There are also, undoubtedly, examples of care homes where things go wrong more frequently – where shortcomings in care are not so much sporadic, as systematic. This is unacceptable. Continue reading

Join us at the BGS Autumn Meeting for a warm Glasgow welcome!

secc-glasgowThe local organising committee in Glasgow have been preparing for the last two years to welcome the BGS Autumn Meeting in November. We are delighted to have such a varied and stimulating programme and are hoping for a well attended, stimulating and interactive conference where good ideas about innovative new services and research programmes will enthuse the membership in their ongoing care of older people in the United Kingdom. Continue reading

Getting out of our box – subspecialty training in Community Geriatrics

Jenny Thain is a Specialty Trainee and Wei Mei Chua is a recently appointed consultant in Geriatric Medicine.  Jenny is based in Nottingham and Wei in Derby, UK.  Both took part in a newly designed Specialty Training Rotation in Geriatric Medicine at Nottingham University Hospitals in 2012-2013. Here they share their experienceshutterstock_99252104

In August 2012 we were privileged to take up the first dedicated specialty training post in Community Geriatrics in the UK. We were, at that time, two less-than-full-time trainees in the East Midlands region, and both of us were in the latter stages of our training. Over the years we had participated in the odd community session, such as domiciliary visits and community hospital ward rounds. But it was only when we took up this post – which lasted a year – that we discovered the extensive nature of the sub-specialty and what it had to offer. Continue reading

Move Aside, Geriatrician!

Keith Miller is a GP in Leeds and a member of Leeds West Clinical Commissioning Group. He tweets at @keester76shutterstock_98521136

We all know we have an ageing population. We stare with trepidation at the impending challenges of the ageing baby-boom generation, and the increasing numbers of people living with multiple long-term conditions. We also know that the NHS is developing through a time of unprecedented change, and the financial efficiencies it must realise require fundamental reorganisation of the way we have come to deliver services to our populations. Primary and community care are the answer. Continue reading