Prevalence of sarcopenia in community-dwelling older people in the UK

Harnish Patel is a Consultant Geriatrician and Honorary Clinical Senior Lecturer, University of Southampton.Prevalence of sarcopenia

Sarcopenia, the loss of skeletal muscle mass and function with age is now recognised as a major clinical problem for older people. Sarcopenia is common and associated with serious health consequences in terms of frailty, disability, morbidity and mortality, not forgetting the high health care costs which have run into billions of dollars in the USA.

Research in the area is expanding exponentially.The European Working Group on Sarcopenia in Older People (EWGSOP) recently published consensus guidelines on the definition and diagnosis of sarcopenia. This definition was an important development in sarcopenia research and has provided a systematic approach not only in case finding but also in understanding aetiology and developing treatments. Using the working group definitions we have, for the first time, estimated the prevalence of sarcopenia in the UK. In our paper, the prevalence of sarcopenia was estimated to affect 4.6% men and 7.9% women with an average age of 67 years – broadly comparable to international estimates. Continue reading

You don’t need to be thin to be frail

Dr Katie Sheehan is a Vancouver based physiotherapist and a recent research fellow at The Irish Longitudinal Study on Ageing. You can see her platform presentation at 11.45 on Friday 21st at the BGS Scientific Meeting.obeseFrailty

Frailty is often thought of as a wasting disorder and, as such, is frequently considered a consequence of ageing incurred by those older adults who present as underweight.  The Fried model of frailty includes reduced gait velocity, low physical activity levels, weakness, exhaustion and weight loss. But frailty isn’t the sole preserve of the thin. As people get older, muscle mass is replaced by fat and physical function deteriorates. This phenomenon offers a particular difficulty for obese older adults who have too low a muscle mass relative to their body size. This mismatch represents a substantial barrier to physical function and may help to explain the recently reported cross sectional ‘U’ shaped relationship between Body Mass Index (BMI) and frailty. This correlation suggests that those who are underweight (body mass index (BMI) < 18.5 kg.m²) and those who are obese (BMI ≥ 30 kg.m²) are more likely to present as frail. Continue reading