Sit up, Get Dressed, Keep Moving: Deconditioning Syndrome Awareness and Prevention Campaign: why is everyone talking about it?

Dr Amit Arora is a consultant geriatrician at the University Hospital of North Midlands and has served as Chairman of England Council of the British Geriatrics Society. He and his team have developed the campaign “Sit up, Get Dressed, Keep Moving” which is being adopted in many NHS hospitals and abroad.

In David Mitchell’s recent article “‘Get Out of Bed!’ scheme is more symptom than solution for the NHSwhich was published on the Guardian website he appreciates the simplicity and value of the campaign but questions whether the campaign is financially motivated.

I congratulate and thank Mitchell for raising awareness about benefits of early functional normalisation: “The Principle that people who have been hospitalized should re-start normal life as soon as they can is already well established”. He further writes that “it’s suspicious that a campaign exclusively pushing the idea of getting up and going home should coincide so precisely with the NHS’s dire shortage of money.”  I would like to detail how the campaign started and how it is free from any ‘spin’. Continue reading

Time to move: Get up, Get Dressed, Keep moving

Dr Amit Arora is a Consultant Physician and Geriatrician at University Hospital of North Staffordshire, Stoke on Trent and an Honorary Clinical Lecturer at Keele University.

deconditioning-1Many years ago I was subject to restricted mobility following an emergency appendicectomy. It took me a surprisingly long time to regain my strengths and abilities- I noted that despite the youth and the will, my muscles would not move and it took a while to recover back to normal!

When I co-relate this to the frail older people that I see in hospitals, I can understand why someone who was able to function well before they came to hospital takes longer to regain their pre-admission functionality.  Prolonged hospital stay, bed rest and attendant risks may lead to loss of muscle power, strength and abilities. This is something we surely need to avoid. It should help achieve a shorter length of stay, better outcomes for patients and better ability at discharge. Continue reading