Leading The Way

11116578645_3cacb41a9d_oSarah Blayney is a Clinical Fellow in the Calgary Stroke Program at Foothills Hospital, University of Calgary. In this blog, she recounts her experience of attending the first BGS Leadership Conference in November.

After nearly nine months of trying to fit into an academic neurology department, it was a huge relief to find myself surrounded by geriatricians once again. My sense of adventure took me to Canada on a stroke fellowship earlier this year, in what I thought would be a refreshing break from the trials and tribulations of life as a medical registrar in today’s NHS. The calibre of stroke training is second to none, and learning to think like a ‘Calgary stroke neurologist’ has sharpened my clinical approach far more than I anticipated.

However I have also come to fully understand the meaning of silos within healthcare, and the effect this can have for patients with multiple medical problems.  The department is well led, with highly motivated teams across acute and rehab units, outpatients, research offices and clerical staff, but it pains me every time our service backs off from the care of a frail elderly patient deemed unlikely to benefit from admission to the acute stroke unit (though occasionally I sneak one in when I can). Our response time to acute stroke patients is excellent, but for those that turn out not to be stroke, it can mean a delay in getting them to the right place as well as multiple reviews by different people along the way.

It was in this frame of mind that I returned to the UK for a fortnight of courses and conferences to ensure a smooth CCT sign-off when I return in the spring.  Word had got round about the first BGS Management Course run last year and I was keen to get back for this year’s course if at all possible; it proved to be the highlight of my trip.  We are all too aware of the problems currently facing the NHS, but the pre-course reading list opened my eyes to the volume of resources being generated to combat these problems.  I find everything I have seen so far from the King’s Fund to be particularly practical and insightful, unlike some of the political statements that come from elsewhere. This set the tone neatly for a well thought out two days of discussions and workshops. Aspirations are important, but sharing best practice and brainstorming potential pitfalls is essential when it comes to rolling up our sleeves and making these aspirations real, and the course delivered just that.

Simulation is such a useful way of making the leap from theoretical discussion to a real life interaction, so roleplay and “Dragons Den” style workshops were a fun and very practical way of exploring some of the issues we may face as future consultants. Birmingham City Council obliged in making this even more true to life by issuing a parking ticket just before one such mock ‘management meeting’, very effectively raising the frustration levels of our acting medical director! The opportunity to ask questions, as well as be put on the spot, created a stimulating environment. The course timetable had clearly been planned to reinforce this, as regular coffee breaks allowed conversations to continue and develop outside of the structured sessions.

Hearing anecdotes on the second day from our course facilitators about their own experiences in developing new services was a tidy way of drawing together the principles we had explored earlier.  It also prepared me well for the task ahead of finding the right consultant job, and clarified my thoughts as to the direction my career may take in the next five years.  My other half recently challenged me on my use of the term ‘dynamic young geriatricians’ when I described to him the BGS course faculty, and this did give me pause for thought (as a surgical registrar who has encountered Dr Wyrko at work, he has his own ideas of what dynamic might mean in this context).  The last thing I would wish would be to appear ageist towards my older and wiser consultant colleagues, many of whom have taught me a great deal over the last nine years, but I am sure they would agree that the hospital world is changing.

We as a generation of trainees have been in the thick of it when it comes to the current state of acute hospital medicine, and have developed a different expectation of what our future working life will look like as a result.  My experiences as both a UK stroke registrar and a Canadian stroke fellow have only served to strengthen my conviction that our frail elderly patients deserve faster, better care than the NHS can currently offer in many places.  My two days under the expert coaching of Drs Gordon, Wyrko, Conroy, Blundell, Long and Oliver have provided the insight and skills to play my part in making this happen.

Image credit: Ascent Magazine via flickr.

One thought on “Leading The Way

  1. Thank god for the enthusiasm of young doctors revealed in so many of these blogs I
    hope it can be nurtured until they become consultants in the NE of UK.

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